Hebrew Course Catalog

language curriculum
undergraduate course offerings
combined graduate & undergraduate seminars
graduate seminars
special-purpose course numbers

 


Language

1101 Elementary Hebrew I (4)

Conversation, reading, writing, vocabulary building, phonetics, and grammar of Hebrew. Closed to native speakers of this language.  Prereq: Not open to students with 3 or more years of high school Hebrew through regular course enrollment or EM credit or credit for 101. This course is available for EM credit. GE for lang course.     Example Syllabus

1102 Elementary Hebrew II (4)

Reading of passages from various periods of Hebrew literature; review of salient points of elementary grammar & introduction to elements of classical Hebrew. Not open to native speakers of this language through regular course enrollment or EM credit.  Prereq: 1101, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 102. This course is available for EM credit. GE for lang course.     Example Syllabus

1103 Intermediate Hebrew I (4)

Reading of Modern Hebrew short stories, poems, and essays; special emphasis on oral practice and Hebrew idioms. Closed to native speakers of this language.  Prereq: 1102, or permission of instructor. This course is available for EM credit. GE for lang course.     Example Syllabus

2105 Modern Hebrew Grammar, Conversation, and Composition (4)

Development of communication skills in Modern Hebrew; special emphasis on using new grammatical skills in advanced forms of composition and conversation. Not open to native speakers of this language or students with EM credit.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 205.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies,

The purpose of this course is to continue to develop communication skills in Modern (Israeli) Hebrew. This includes reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension. Equal emphasis is placed on each of these language skills. Special emphasis will be given to using new grammatical skills in advanced forms of composition and conversation.     Example Syllabus

4101 Review of Grammar and Composition (4)

Review of Hebrew grammar; composition on assigned topics and some practice in translation.  Prereq: 1103 (104). Not open to students with credit for 401. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.

The objectives of Hebrew 4101 are: to review the grammatical patterns which have been covered in the elementary and intermediate courses (i.e., Hebrew 1101-1103); to introduce and practice new, more advanced grammatical patterns; and to improve students' Hebrew writing skills. During the quarter, students are required to write a number of compositions. The instructor will review each of these eight compositions and returns them to the student with grammatical exercises geared to his/her own needs. The classroom activity centers around the following: readings in modern Hebrew texts that will assist students in building up vocabulary and improving their knowledge of grammar; explanations of grammatical patterns; and analysis of typical mistakes found by the instructor in the weekly assignments.     Example Syllabus

 


Undergraduate Coursework

 

2205 Art and Ancient Judaism (3)

An exploration of the nature and function of art in ancient Judaism from the standpoints of history, cultural history, and material culture.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 345. GE VPA course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies     Example Syllabus 

2209 The World of the Rabbis (3)

Examination of the origins, literature, and religious values of the movement of intellectuals who remade the culture of Judaism in the 2nd through 6th centuries.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 379.  GE cultures and ideas course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies      

Judaism today has its roots in a remarkable movement of intellectuals who remade an entire people's culture in a few short centuries. These people were known as Rabbis, or Teachers, and are responsible for some of the classics of Judaism, such as the intricate dialectic of the Talmud, the fanciful and insightful biblical interpretations of the Midrash, and the poetry of the Jewish prayerbook. In this course students will get to know this movement: its history, its literature, and its religious values. In doing so students will explore questions important to the study of religions, such as how a religious people responds to catastrophe, the relationship of law and spirituality, and the nature of holiness in ancient societies.     Example Syllabus

2216 The Medieval Jewish Experience (3)

A survey of ten centuries of medieval Jewish culture from the rise of Islam to the death of Shabbetai Zvi, the false Messiah (1676).  Prereq: Not open to students who have taken 216, MedRen 2516 (Medieval 216), or JewshSt 2516. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in MedRen 2516 and JewshSt 2516.

Scattered through the lands of Christendom and Islam, medieval Jewish communities flourished from Spain to Persia, from England to the Yemen. Despite periodic persecutions, medieval Jewry proved to be enormously resilient and creative. Figures such as Saadya Gaon, Moses Maimonides, and Judah Loew of Prague provided their communities with dynamic leadership in troubled times, while bequeathing an impressive literary legacy to posterity. The rich and varied body of Hebrew classics composed during this period includes the commentaries of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, and Nahmanides, the poetry of Ibn Gabirol and Halevi, the Codes of Jacob B. Asher and Joseph Karo, and that treasury of Jewish mysticism, the Zohar. This course surveys ten centuries of medieval Jewish culture from the rise of Islam to the death of Shabbetai Zvi, the false Messiah (1676). Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in both the Christian and Islamic worlds. A generous selection of primary sources (in translation) will introduce students to the social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of medieval Jewry.     Example Syllabus

2241[/H] Culture of Contemporary Israel (3)

An introduction to the culture of modern Israel: historical roots, socio-political institutions and developments, and literary and artistic creations reflecting the realities of contemporary Israeli society.  Prereq: 2241H requires Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 241. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies 2242.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary Israeli culture in all of its diversity. In the fifty years since the founding of the State, Israeli society has faced a series of dramatic challenges and has undergone tremendous changes. This course will survey the major social, cultural, religious and political trends in Israel, focusing on the post-1967 period. Issues to be explored include responses to founding ideals and ideologies; the impact of the Arab-Israeli conflict; Jewish perceptions of Arabs; efforts to absorb new waves of immigration and to deal with questions of ethnicity; tensions between the religious and secular sectors of society; the centrality of the family; and the social, political and religious status of women. The course will draw on a broad range of material, including print media and films. By the end of the course, students should have an insight into the complexity of Israeli society and an understanding of Israel's role in Jewish life, the Middle East, and the world at large.     Example Syllabus

 

2245 Israeli Film & Society (3) 

A survey of Israeli films from 1948 to the present day, tracing the development of film production in Israel as well as the relationship between film and society.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 245. GE VPA course .Cross-listed in Jewish Studies,     Example Syllabus 

2367.01 Script & Scripture: The Bible in Contemporary Arts, Media, and Literature (3)

The Bible is a foundational text for contemporary art, literature, and political discourse as well as a sacred text in some religious traditions. This course examines Biblical reflections in cultural production, with particular focus on the American experience. It also gives students opportunities to see their own cultural contexts anew, and to explore the Bible's possible relevance to our time.  Prereq: English 1110.01 or equiv. GE writing and comm: level 2 and VPA course.     Example Syllabus

2700[/H] Biblical and Post-Biblical Hebrew Literature in Translation (3)

Reading and analysis of selected chapters from the Hebrew scriptures and post-biblical Hebrew writings representative of major historical, cultural, and literary trends.  Prereq: 2700H requires Honors standing or permission of instructor.  English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 370. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with some fundamental insights into the Hebrew Scriptures (the Old Testament) within the context of their social, cultural, and historical milieux, as well as their common Near Eastern setting. One of the main objectives is to explore the searching spirit of ancient man for ultimate issues, such as the purpose of existence, the destiny of man, the problem of evil, etc. While this course stresses that the Hebrew Scriptures cannot be understood and still less appreciated without their larger cultural setting, it also strives to point out the distinctive features of these scriptures. Insights from post-biblical Hebrew exegeses (Talmud, Midrash, etc.) are provided. In addition to the traditional approach, contributions from a great many academic disciplines are utilized to provide diverse scholarly and objective views of the Holy Scriptures. This course is taught in English.     Example Syllabus

 

2701 Medieval Hebrew Literature in Translation (3)

Reading and analysis of medieval Hebrew Literature from the Near East, North Africa, and Europe.  Prereq: English 1110. Not open to students with credit for 371.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.

The objectives of this course are: 1) to acquaint the student with the various literary genres of Hebrew literature in the medieval period; 2) to highlight the influences on and development of this literature; and 3) to understand the importance and role of medieval Jewry and their literature in Jewish history. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.       

2702[/H] Modern Hebrew Literature in Translation (3)

A survey of major themes and topics in Modern Hebrew literature from the middle of the 19th century to the present.  Prereq: English 1110 (110); honors standing for 2702H. Not open to students with credit for 372. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the richly variegated body of modern Hebrew literature, while challenging them to read and write analytically. The major elements in this literature, from its origins in nineteenth-century Eastern Europe to its flowering in present-day Israel, will be examined. Addressing questions of aesthetics and literary context, the course will highlight such major themes as the tension between tradition and modernity; the rise of Zionism; the negation of the Diaspora; the pioneer experience; the Arab-Israeli conflict; responses to the Holocaust; the relationship of the individual to the collectivity; optimism and disillusionment. Readings will consist of novels, short stories and poems in English translation. Literary critical evaluations will be assigned in connection with oral presentations and term papers.     Example Syllabus

 

2703 Prophecy in the Bible and Post-Biblical Literature (3)

The dynamics of Israelite prophecy and apocalyptic in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 373. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. .

By the end of this course, the student will be able to: 1) articulate the essential features of Israelite prophecy as a distinctive social phenomenon in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture; 2) trace the evolution of the phenomenon in Israel from its rise to its decline and ultimate transformation into apocalyptic; 3) identify the nuances and idiosyncrasies of certain individual prophets; and 4) identify the primary contributions of the prophetic phenomenon to the Judaeo-Christian heritage. To achieve these objectives, class lecture coupled with class discussion will form the core of this course, supplemented by outside readings and written assignments. The readings will include primary and secondary sources, providing the student opportunity for exposure to the prophetic literature at first hand while also supplying input from contemporary scholarship.     Example Syllabus

2704 Women in the Bible and Beyond (3)

An examination of the social, legal, and religious position of women as they appear in the Hebrew Bible and the ways in which the have been represented and interpreted in later textual, visual, and audio sources.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 374. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

This course examines the cultural images and legal status of women during biblical times and late antiquity. Although its focus will be on the period of ancient Israel, students will also examine how biblical narrative and law have continued to have an impact on Jewish, Christian and secular culture. By looking at the images of women in biblical texts, students will be asked how contemporary feminist readers of the Bible have found new meanings in a literature that has been the subject of so much re-reading and re-writing over the centuries. The course will begin with a general review of biblical literature and a historical survey of the status of women in some ancient societies. Throughout, its approach will be interdisciplinary, inviting students to pursue interests in historical, literary critical, feminist, and religious studies approaches.     Example Syllabus

2708 Biblical and Post-Biblical Wisdom Literature (3)

An examination of the various ideas, themes, attitudes, implications, and genres of biblical and post-biblical wisdom literature.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 378. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

This course will explore a number of the biblical sapiential texts and compositions, mainly in Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job, Psalms, the New Testament, and the Apocrypha. The wisdom literary corpus can be divided into two separate yet overlapping categories. One category, exemplified in the Book of Proverbs, constitutes a comprehensive code of conduct, which aims at directing society on the path to success, happiness, and reasonable harmony with its environment. The other category, exemplified by the Books of Ecclesiastes and Job, grapples with the eternal problems that beset humanity, primarily the agonizing question, "Why do the wicked prosper and the righteous suffer?" The course will stress the indivisible unity of the secular, religious, and ethical aspects of biblical wisdom. It will also explore the universal aspects of wisdom and its search for a certain regularity within the diversity of the phenomena of the world. Proper comprehension of biblical wisdom depends upon an understanding of related texts in Egypt and Mesopotamia. The course will address the striking similarities, in thought and form, between biblical wisdom and the Wisdom of Amenemope, Instructions of Merikare, Ptahhotep, and others. Only by means of such comparison will the distinctive features of Israelite wisdom come to prominence. Insights in Rabbinic wisdom (Pirqei Avot) will also be provided. By the end of this course, students will have achieved a broad exposure to the ideas and genres of Old Testament wisdom literature and the values affirmed therein. Through reading the biblical texts and selected secondary literature and commentaries, students will be able to identify the major themes addressed by wisdom literature and the various attitudes, solutions, and consolations it affords.     Example Syllabus

3120 Engaging Time in Philosophy, Religion, Science and the Arts (3)

Explore the concept, meanings and uses of Time from philosophical and Jewish cultural perspectives, incorporating comparisons with time in contemporary arts, literature and sciences. Team-taught class incorporates two intellectual traditions while incorporating arts and scientific perspectives on time as well. Course culminates in interdisciplinary conference on Time in April, on campus. Taught in English.

Fulfills GE Cultures and Ideas requirement.     Example Syllabus

3210[/H] The Jewish Mystical Tradition (3)

The history of Jewish mysticism from antiquity to the present, with emphasis on its implications for the comparative study of religious experience.

Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for NELC 375. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.     Example Syllabus

3705 Israeli Society and the Holocaust (3)

The State of Israel was established soon after the Holocaust. This course examines the effects of the Nazi genocide on Israeli society, including political debates, public trials, films, museums and literature, while also reflecting on larger themes of genocide, trauma, memory, and commemoration. Taught in English.

Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for NELC 375. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.     Example Syllabus

4102 Hebrew and the Media (3)

Practice improving Hebrew conversation, comprehension, and writing through an exploration of contemporary Israeli media such as newspapers, internet, television, radio and film.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 402.      Example Syllabus

4601 Modern Hebrew Short Story (3)

Reading and discussion of masterpieces of modern Hebrew short stories in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 421.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern Hebrew literary texts, as well as to develop reading skills in modern Hebrew. It will survey some of the major developments in the modern Hebrew short story, from the early twentieth century to the present day. Addressing questions of esthetics and literary context, the course will highlight such major themes as the rise of Zionism; the pioneer experience; the Arab-Israeli conflict; responses to the Holocaust; the relationship of the individual to the collectivity; optimism and disillusionment. Readings will be drawn from the work of Agnon, Kishon, Liebrecht, and Megged.     Example Syllabushttps://nelc.osu.edu/file/hebrew-4601-au16.pdf

4602 Modern Hebrew Poetry (3)

Reading and discussion of masterpieces of modern Hebrew poetry in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 422.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the outstanding works of modern Hebrew poetry. It will survey the major developments in this literature, from its origins in nineteenth-century Eastern Europe to its flowering in present-day Israel. Addressing questions of esthetics and literary context, the course will highlight such major themes as the rise of Zionism; the pioneer experience; the Arab-Israeli conflict; responses to the Holocaust; the relationship of the individual to the collectivity; optimism and disillusionment. Readings will be drawn from the masterpieces of Bialik, Tchernikhovsky, U.Z. Greenberg, Shlonsky, Alterman, Goldberg, Gilboa, Gury, Amichai, Pagis, Zach, and Ravikovitch.     Example Syllabus

4605 Readings in the Mishnah (3)

Reading and discussion of the ideas and teachings of the Mishnah as they are reflected in the unique Mishnaic language.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 425. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

This course includes a close reading of passages from the six orders of the Mishnah, selected as examples of Mishnaic style and language. Readings and discussions cover such topics as theories on the development and reaction of the Mishnah, and the role of the Mishnah in the development of Halacha. Special attention is paid to a systematic study of Mishnah Avot, with the purpose of introducing the student to the rabbinic concepts of values embodied in the Mishnaic literature.

 


Combined Graduate / Undergraduate Coursework

 

5100 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (3)

Introduction of main elements of Biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax, for study of ancient and late antique Mediterranean religion and History, for students in Classics, History, NELC, etc. Requires no previous study of Hebrew language but assumes moderate experience with studying another/non-native language.  Prereq: Third-semester level [1103] in any other modern or classical language, or permission of instructor.     Example Syllabus

5101 Biblical Hebrew Grammar (3)

Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Biblical Hebrew idiom.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 601.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

The course covers such topics as vocalization, noun and verb structures, suffixed forms, stress, and vocabulary building, especially as compared to the modern Hebrew idiom. During the second half of the course, selections are read from one or more of the narrative books (e.g., Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings), according to the expressed desire of class members.     Example Syllabus

5105 History of the Hebrew Language (3)

Genealogical and typological relations within the Semitic family; a survey of Biblical, Mishnaic, and Modern Hebrew.  Prereq: 1103 (104), or permission or instructor. Not open to students with credit for 611.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.

A study of the panorama of the entire history of the Hebrew language, from the earliest biblical texts, through Classical and Late Classical Biblical Hebrew, Qumran Hebrew, Mishnaic Hebrew, Medieval Hebrew, early modern Hebrew and standard modern Hebrew. Taught in English. In this course, students read a variety of examples of Hebrew from many different periods, and discuss the development of the language based on the forms found in the texts. A comprehensive introduction is given before the texts are read. The class also reads some examples of Phoenician texts and extra-biblical contemporary texts to highlight the nature of the language as a member of the Semitic family. The unity of the language over time is stressed, and the development of new vocabulary is investigated. The issue of Hebrew as a "dead" language is addressed, and the period of the revival is subjected to linguistic scrutiny.     Example Syllabus

5601 Introduction to Hebrew Literary and Cultural Texts (3)

Literary and cultural Hebrew texts from the biblical to the modern period; students will develop the ability to read critically and to build analytical vocabulary. In Hebrew.  Prereq: 2205 (205), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 620.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

This course introduces the student to Hebrew literary and cultural texts from the biblical to the modern period. Focusing on Jerusalem, students will gain familiarity with a variety of Hebrew literary genres and their distinctive features. While continuing to build vocabulary and reading skills, students will be encouraged to read these texts critically and analytically. Secondary readings (in English) on the history and cultural life of Jerusalem will provide additional insights.     Example Syllabus

5602 The Bible as Literature: Selected Readings (3)

Critical study of basic issues in the language and analysis of biblical texts. In Hebrew.  Prereq: 4601 (421) or 4602 (422). Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. Cross-listed in Jewish Studies. 

Selections from different parts of the Hebrew Scriptures are studied with an emphasis on their literary, grammatical, syntactical, historical and theological content. Attention is given to both rabbinic textual exegeses and modern philological and critical approaches. The course explores various genres of biblical literature: myth, epic, law, prophecy, poetry, and wisdom literature.     Example Syllabus

5603 Readings in Rabbinic Literature (3)

Study of selected texts and issues in Rabbinic literature, and discussions of the methods by which they are studied. In Hebrew.  Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.     Example Syllabus

5801 Basic Bibliographic and Reference Tools in Hebraica, Judaica, and Semitics (3)

A survey of tools which may be used in doing research at all levels in the study of Hebraica, Judaica, and Semitics.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 680.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the different types of research sources available in English, Hebrew, and western European languages. Examples of these diverse sources will be shown in class, and students will be asked to evaluate and report to the class on individual titles. While much of the discussion will, of necessity, center on using tools available in the Ohio State libraries, the emphasis will be upon 1) learning a methodology which can be applied to any research topic, 2) using bibliographic tools in any research institution, and 3) evaluating sources of information.     Example Syllabus

5802 The Problem of Evil in Biblical and Post-Biblical Literature (3)

Study of the vexing problem of evil; the seeming contradiction between tradition and experience; extensive readings and discussions of appropriate biblical and post-biblical literature. In English.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 671.

This is an exploration of the most vexing of all biblical and post-biblical questions: how can a just and infallible God allow evil in His world and how does one account for the seeming contradiction between tradition and experience? Relevant passages from the Bible (Job and Koheleth in particular) and selections from apocryphal and rabbinic literature will be studied, along with comparable texts from ancient Near Eastern literatures and additional readings in contemporary secondary literature. Graduate students and undergraduate Hebrew majors will be required to read the texts in the original Hebrew.     Example Syllabus

5806 Studies in Biblical Law (3)

Examination of the various biblical corpora of laws within the context of a great body of legal collections which extended throughout the ancient Near East.  Prereq: 3370H (370H), or Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 676.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.     Example Syllabus


Graduate Coursework

7601 Studies in Hebrew Poetry (3)

Advanced study of specific poetic periods, figures, and/or topics involving extensive readings and discussions of appropriate primary and secondary materials.  Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Sample Topic (1): The Lyrical Voice and the National Predicament This course involves a critical study of the development of modern Hebrew poetry, focusing on the elements of linguistic usage, artistic styles, and ideological stances. The Hebrew poets' involvement with the dramatic events of modern Jewish history has rendered much of their art the voice of a national consciousness. At the same time they display modernist sensitivities and lyrical individualism. Focusing on the tension between personal lyricism and the statement of the national predicament, we will examine the career of modern Hebrew poetry in terms of its development toward contemporary modernist poetics and its reflection of the plights of the Jews and the Israeli experience in the twentieth century. Through close readings and detailed textual analysis of works by prominent Hebrew poets, students will gain some awareness of the complexity of modern Hebrew literary culture, increase their linguistic competence, and sharpen their appreciation of modern poetical texts.

Sample Topic (2): The Book of Psalms. The purpose of this course is to study the psalms as religious lyrics, focusing mainly on their ideas, moods, syntactical turns, and literary devices. The main literary types of the psalms (Gattungen) will be explored with the aim of identifying the Sitz-im-Leben of each type: i.e., their proper setting and their traditionally fixed function in religious life. The form and content of the psalms will be analyzed within the context of the literary compositions of the same general pattern, emanating from earlier and contemporary cultures of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Ugarit.

7602 Studies in Hebrew Prose (3)

Advanced study of specific periods, authors, and/or topics of prose writing, involving extensive reading and discussion of primary and secondary materials.  Prereq: Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Sample Topic (1): The Narrative Art of S.Y. Agnon Nobel Laureate S.Y. Agnon occupies a unique position in modern Hebrew literature. His artistic style, thematic concerns, and ideological attitudes reflect the crucial transition in Jewish history from tradition to modernism and the movement from the flourishment of shtetl culture to the secular achievements of the State of Israel. A critical study and discussion of Agnon's works will provide the student with an insight into the diversity of his art, his mastery of different genres, and the complexity of his world view. Reading secondary sources will highlight different interpretations of some of Agnon's enigmatic stories and the alternative approaches to his entire work.

Sample Topic (2): Studies in Biblical Prose Texts. The aim of this course is twofold: a) to increase the student's linguistic competence in dealing with Biblical Hebrew prose texts, and b) to introduce him/her to the major prose genres in the Tanakh (narratives, legal corpora) and their various sub-types. Particular attention will be paid to characteristic literary structures and linguistic patterns in the texts studied. Through the reading of some of the modern commentary and secondary literature, the student will also become familiar with the dominant traditions of modern biblical scholarship, particularly literary criticism and form criticism.     Example Syllabus

7891 Teaching Hebrew at the College Level (3)

Methods and techniques for teaching Hebrew at the college level.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 801.

The areas to be addressed are theories of language learning, instructional methods and techniques, and teaching the four skills, including testing oral proficiency, as well as topics specific to the teaching of Hebrew.


Special- and General-Purpose Course Numbers

2193 Individual Studies (1-10)

Individual studies.  Prereq: Permission of instructor or department. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs or 5 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

2194 Group Studies (1-10)

Group studies.  Prereq: Permission of instructor or department. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs or 5 completions.

 

4998 Undergraduate Research in Hebrew (1-3)

Offers undergraduates with special aptitudes a greater opportunity to do more independent study and research than is possible in normal course work.  Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs or 5 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

4998H Undergraduate Honors Research in Hebrew (1-3)

Offers undergraduate honors students a rigorous opportunity to do more independent study and research than is possible in normal coursework.  Prereq: Honors standing, and permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 783H. This course is graded S/U.

 

4999 Undergraduate Thesis (1-3)

Offers undergraduates with special aptitudes and advanced skills the opportunity to do independent study leading to a thesis.  Prereq: Sr standing, B average in Hebrew coursework, permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs or 5 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

4999H Undergraduate Honors Thesis (1-3)

Offers undergraduates with special aptitudes the opportunity to do independent study leading to an honors thesis.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs or 5 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

5193 Individual Studies (1-10)

Individual Studies.  Prereq: Permission of department. Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs or 5 completions. This course is graded S/U.

5194 Group Studies (1-10)

Group Studies.  Prereq: Permission of department. Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs or 5 completions.

8891 Seminar in Hebrew Studies (3)

Intensive investigation of a selected topic or problem in Hebrew linguistics, philology, literature, or literary culture.  Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.

This course will give graduate students an opportunity to explore thoroughly a major issue or phenomenon in the larger context of Hebrew and Judaic literary culture or linguistics and to examine its ramifications and implications. The objective is to provide a well-defined area of concentrated literary/cultural or linguistic study and invite the investigation of a specific scholarly problem through the application of appropriate research skills and methodological approaches.

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